• A History of Innovation 

     

     Jorgensen 1960

    Since 1950, Mequon, Wisconsin based Jorgensen Conveyors, Inc. has been solving 
problems for our customers with proven lines of conveyors, coolant filtration and material 
handling equipment.  Jorgensen also designs and builds a complete line of process feeder
conveyors for the recycling industry.  Founded by Charles T. Jorgensen, the company started in all phases of general 
conveyor design, manufacture and installation in many types of manufacturing applications. 
Early customers included major manufacturing companies such as International Harvester, 
American Motors, JI Case, AO Smith, Ford Motor Company, and General Motors. Conveyor
types included hinged steel belt, roller, heavy duty scrap handling and apron conveyors, 
overhead trolley, slat and chain conveyors.

  • In the mid '50's Jorgensen began to get involved in conveyors for machine tool applications 
involving transfer and pallet shuttle systems. Along with these systems, it was at this time that 
Jorgensen began to build metal belt conveyors to handle chips, turnings and scrap produced by 
machine tools. These first machine tool chip conveyors were built using belts purchased from 
other manufacturers. Jorgensen bought the belt, built the conveyor casing and drive and sold the
finished unit to the OEM machine tool builder market.

    Recognizing the weaknesses of existing metal belts, Jorgensen designed its own belt, had
the proper tooling made and began to produce their own belt. The first stamping dies to produce 
belt parts were made in 1954. At this point, the OEM machine tool market was starting to 
become a substantial part of Jorgensen's business. Gisholt (Giddings & Lewis), Sundstrand and 
Greenlee were among our first machine tool builder customers. In the late '50's and early '60's, 
the machine tool chip conveyor market developed as speeds, feeds and chip volumes increased, 
creating demand for automated chip handling.

    In the succeeding years, Jorgensen continued to refine and improve our original design, and 
developed our present patented 2-1/2" pitch chain featuring the off-set side wings, chain side 
bars and axles that pass through the hinge loops of the belt apron plates and all of the chain 
parts. The patents obtained by Charles T. Jorgensen on the off-set "pass through" side wing 
came in the early '60's. This design development was a key factor in Jorgensen becoming a 
major player in the growing machine tool chip conveyor market. It was and still is an ideal chain
for the end-user customer since it is so easy to take the belt apart for maintenance purposes. The 
design was also very cost effective, since it requires fewer parts.

     

    • During the '60's, Jorgensen also designed 4", 6", and 9" pitch apron belt with the same ease 
of assembly and disassembly features for larger scrap and parts handling applications in the 
metal working industries. Additional belt designs were developed in the 6" and 9" pitch sizes to 
meet the more rigorous specifications of the automotive industry.
    • In 1975 a 1-1/2" pitch belt used primarily for machine tool chip conveyors was introduced for the OEM market.
This development was driven by the machine tool industry's trend for building smaller machines 
allowing less space for the chip conveyor. Again, the patented features as to belt detachability were retained.
    • In 1995, Jorgensen developed the Filterveyor®, a chip removal system that addressed the coolant 
filtration requirements of the high speed CNC metal cutting machine tools.
    • During the 80's Jorgensen built our current 100,000 square foot plant and headquarters office building. 
    • In 2001 a partnership was established with Broxtec, Inc. in the Czech Republic to gain new 
business and service our customers in the European market.
    • In 2002 LoadTamer® Line of process feeder conveyors for the recycling industry was patented.
    • In 2010, Jorgensen introduced the ChipBlocker®.  A simple, retrofitted accessory unit for 
metal cutting machine tool chip conveyor, virtually eliminating chip carry-back into the 
conveyor and chip accumulation in the coolant supply tank.
    •  In 2011, Jorgensen began a new collaborative manufacturing and sales agreement with
Sovereign Tech of Mumbai, India.  Sovereign Tech has a state of the art 
facility in India with an in-house core team comprised of experienced and qualified process 
engineers, machine tool engineers, tool engineers, maintenance engineers & chemical 
engineers. They, alongside Jorgensen’s own staff,  will provide the technical skills needed to 
engineer and manufacturer Jorgensen’s custom conveyor and filtration product lines for the 
Indian Metal Working Industry at large. This relationship is strong today. 
    • In 2012, Jorgensen introduced its' popular MunchMan Conveyor at the IMTS show in Chicago. 
The twin steel belt MunchMan is designed to manage the "bird's nest" and long stringy chips 
produced during high speed turning operations. In 2013, the new and improved single 
drive MunchMan II® (Patent Pending) is released with great success.
    • 2014 saw Jorgensen introduce the EcoFilter® Conveyor. It features an innovative two 
stage chip removal and coolant filtration design.  It is the first mid-priced system for turning 
and machining centers, takes up no more "footprint" than a traditional conveyor and can be ordered 
as an "EcoFilter® ready" option that allows an easy retrofit.

    • Throughout 2016, Jorgensen has become a resource for filtration systems for the composite machining industry. We have worked closely 
with our customers to develop an extremely effective system.

      

     PLant-2016

     

    Jorgensen's design innovation and willingness to build to the customers specifications in the 
formative years of the machine tool chip conveyor market helped to establish our leading position in the 
industry. The company continues to be owned and operated by third generation descendants of 
Charles T. Jorgensen, John and Chuck D'Amico. Jorgensen currently operates in a 100,000 square 
foot office and manufacturing facility in Mequon, Wisconsin, a suburb of Milwaukee.